International Institute for Asian Studies
Kazakhstan

Toward a true Eurasia? EU strategy in Central Asia: a view from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan

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European Union enlargement brings it geographically closer to Central Asia, which increases the significance of interregional relations, stability and security throughout Eurasia. From the first days of independence, Central Asian states made strengthening ties to Europe a foreign policy priority. Especially after signing Partnership and Cooperation Agreements with the EU, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan in particular brimmed with enthusiasm for closer cooperation.

Forty houses should forbid the girls: bride kidnapping amongst the Kazakh of western Mongolia

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Non-consensual bride kidnapping is practiced in western Mongolia amongst the Kazakh diaspora. In neighbouring Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan the practice is thought to be increasing. In Mongolia there are no data indicating the prevalence of the practice, but according to local women it is a common occurrence. Although bride kidnapping is illegal, incidents are not generally reported to the police, and kidnappers are almost never charged. Anna Portisch considers one young woman’s kidnapping, and reflects on social control mechanisms within the community and how they are negotiated.

China's energy policy towards the Caspian region: the case of Kazakhstan

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Energy security is an important component of national security as a whole. In the past 20 years, with China’s economy developing rapidly, its demand for oil has also grown. According to the 2009 forecast by the International Environmental Organization (IEO), the world’s total energy consumption will increase by about 44 percent annually, between 2006 and 2030. The estimation is that the non-OECD economies will show the largest increase in energy demand. China and India are the two fastest-growing non-OECD economies, and they will be key world energy consumers in the future.

Kazakhstan and Perestroika: was a chance at "heroism" lost?

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On 17-18 December 1986, a students’ uprising took place in Almaty, the capital of the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic (KazSSR). The pretext for the riots (commonly referred to as the December events) was the appointment of the non-Kazakh and non-Kazakhstani “person from outside”, G. Kolbin, to the post of the First Secretary of the KazSSR Communist Party. The former First Secretary, D. Konayev, who had been leading the Republic since 1964, was removed from his post “due to the pension age”. The change of leadership in Kazakhstan happened as a result of the rotation of cadres’ launched by M. Gorbachev to realise the newly proclaimed perestroika course.